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The Future of education in Africa

Education in Africa

The Future of education in Africa

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The Future of education in Africa

Free Education Africa is a new mobile app and website for learners in Africa. It’s where all learners no matter their age can come to learn for free in levels.

Students can, therefore, be on any level from 1 – 6 depending on their development and understanding of content. Levels make it possible for any teacher to also use the App or the website in classes or on learners individual devices.

Free Education Africa is a free service Best Education Solutions.

Free Education Africa was developed with a strong belief in respect for one another and building bridges between ideas amongst future generations in Africa.

Why Free Education for Africa?

“We are busy with the development of content under each level in English, Afrikaans and Maths.

Our team are working around the clock to bring Africa on board to create our own jobs and not allowing the East or West to invade our countries. We need to create jobs and educate our society to create our own world with African values (trust, love and ubunto).

We encourage all Africans to join in creating a better world for everyone.” – Wright Kotzee, Founder of Best Education Solutions.

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Rules for all learners, educators and parents at schools in South Africa

school rules - covid 19

Rules for all learners, educators, support staff, officials, parents and communities:

  • Avoid gatherings.

  • Maintain a social distance of at least 1.5-2 metres to others, where possible.

  • Every learner, staff member and visitor must wear a cloth mask at all times.

  • Avoid direct contact with others e.g. shaking hands or hugging.

  • Frequently wash hands with water and soap.

  • Avoid touching the face (i.e. eyes, nose, mouth) with unwashed hands.

  • Eradicate all forms of stigma and discrimination as a result of Covid-19.

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South Africa expected to delay reopening of schools!

South Africa expected to delay reopening of schools

The paper reported that Motshekga acknowledged to the five unions and three major governing body associations that met with her that “the system is not completely ready”.

There are also concerns that some provinces are much better equipped for a return to school than others.

Teachers and governing bodies are expected to use the postponement to prepare, and buy time to deliver water to schools without running water, where tanks had not been delivered.

Motshekga is expected to make an announcement later on Sunday about the delay.

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Back to school latest: Five major changes under consideration

Monday was set to be a waiting game for the learners, teachers and parents of South Africa – but their agonising will continue for a little while longer. At some point in the day, it was expected that Education Minister Angie Motshekga would outline the ‘back to school’ roadmap for our youngsters. But, for the third time this month, the address has been postponed.

1. GRADES TO RETURN SEPARATELY

It was the headline feature of the Education Department’s draft proposals, and it is likely to remain in place as part of the final submissions: But Grade 12 and Grade 7 students may soon be told that they will be the first ones back to school when it is safe to resume. The department is still, apparently, looking to restart in early June.

2. SOME CITIES COULD FALL BEHIND THE REST OF THE COUNTRY, KEEPING THEIR SCHOOLS CLOSED

The department is going to have to consider how different parts of the country are coping with coronavirus. Each of South Africa’s 52 districts will be assessed individually before getting approval to move on to an easier stage of lockdown. But disease hot-spots in Cape Town, Johannesburg, Ekurhuleni, eThekwini, Buffalo City, Mangaung, and NMB may not be able to open their doors due to the high risk of transmission.

3. COULD GRADE 12 LEARNERS BE SENT TO ‘LEARNING CAMPS’?

This one surfaced on Sunday, but it’s understood that the Education Department is considering putting more than 150 000 Grade 12 students into ‘special learning camps’ away from home, for a period of five weeks.

Several representatives from the teaching industry have backed the idea, which would isolate matric learners along with their classmates and teachers. The aim would be to teach the remainder of the school year in just a matter of weeks, ramping up the intensity of the lessons. This is likely to be discussed over the next 24 hours.

4. BACK TO SCHOOL: STUDENTS MAY ATTEND ‘ON ALTERNATE DAYS OR WEEKS’

The department’s director-general, Mathanzima Mweli, suggested during a virtual meeting with governing body associations and a principals’ association on Sunday that the school calendar itself could undergo a massive change.

 

According to TimesLive, different grades would be told to attend classes on alternate days of the week or in alternate weeks. For example, Grade 7 pupils could attend on a Monday and Tuesday, on ‘week one’ of the new calendar. Mweli believes this could work if schools operate at 50% of capacity.

5. ‘THE PLATOON SYSTEM’ COULD GET KIDS BACK TO SCHOOL

There has been a lot of chatter about this, and with good reason. We understand Angie Motshekga and her team are considering ‘platooning’ children. That means sending them into school where some grades only attend in the morning then head home, before other grades come in for the afternoon shift.

There’s a belief that giving each grade their own time in the school will properly allow for smaller class sizes and the practices of social distancing. Angie Motshekga was due to confirm some of these changes on Monday, but the Education Department have once again stalled for more time.

Let’s hope our new time-slot of 16:00 on Tuesday remains in place.

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Our input on reopening schools during lockdown is ignored, say unions

Johannesburg – Two of the country’s biggest unions have indicated that they will not support any decision taken on Monday by the council of ministers at their meeting to discuss the reopening of schools.

“We were consulted, but the department comes to consult for formality, not alternative ideas. The provincial departments are doing their own thing, and nothing we discuss at national level makes any difference. For the reopening of schools, the departments must fully comply with regulations and occupational health and safety. None of the provinces are ready,” Maluleke warned.

“It is suspicious that all the provincial education departments are quiet about this. It could lead to speculation that they are in a conundrum. We insist that we will never allow overcrowded classes to be taught and that we want only one child per desk.”

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