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YOUR CHILD’S LEARNING STYLE

my childs learning style

LET’S HELP YOU UNDERSTAND YOUR CHILD’S LEARNING STYLE

UNDERSTAND YOUR CHILD’S LEARNING STYLE

Too very often, children are misunderstood and end up underperforming because parents and teachers don’t know how to deal with them, addressing the child’s learning style.

Let’s face it; our education system shows a great deal of bias when it comes to skill and cognitive development of students. Teaching can not be a one size fits all programme. There are things you as a parent can do to supplement the learning process and arming yourself with all the necessary tools and information to help your child.

Understanding the human brain is of vital importance. 

The left side of the brain controls logical thinking. Like Maths and facts. 

The right side of the brain controls visuals, imagination and feelings. 

It depends on which side of the brain is most dominant in your child. Some learners learn best through pictures (visual learners). Others though listening (auditory learners). Some are more hands-on learners (they have to be physically involved for them to learn)

Howard Gardner, a Harvard professor, did research that came out some of the following classic learning styles to help us understand the different learning styles.

The Linguistic learner

The Linguistic learner

The most common type of learner, might not be really since this type of learning is the one imposed on students in schools. This learner learns best by reading, writing, listening or speaking. For example, this learner would have to read something, internalise it and then write it down from their brain. They also tend to talk about it, reciting what they have learned.

The Logical/Mathematical Learner

The Logical:Mathematical Learner

They must classify or categorise things. Patterns, relationships, numbers and equations are a walk in the park for them. These are your future engineers, mathematicians, scientists and other technical professions. They are useful in problem-solving.

The Visual or Spatial Learner

The Visual or Spatial Learner

These learners learn best with the aids of visual aid. Pictures, diagrams and graphs are precisely what they need. Almost like logical learners, they tend to enter technically-oriented and engineering fields. Your child would have a great future in IT and computer programming since computers are conceptual.

The Musical or Rhythmic Learner

The Musical or Rhythmic Learner

Learns using melody or rhythm. Most likely to be a musician, learning how to play by listening to a piece of music. Can be a learner who learns best when humming, whistling, toe-tapping, tapping their pencil on the desk, wiggling, or listening to music in the background. Music, for them, is not a distraction but helps with the learning process.

The Naturalist

The Naturalist learner

The naturalist learns by working with and experiencing nature. Best capture information or knowledge through experimentation.

The Physical or Kinaesthetic learner

The Physical or Kinaesthetic learner

They need to get their hands dirty! They need to interact with the objects around them. According to FamilyEducation.com jobs like those in the arts, manufacturing or creative fields are ideal for these learners. 

The Interpersonal Learner

The Interpersonal Learner

Relating to others is how they learn. They share stories and ideas, work best in teams. Mostly found in fields of psychology and social sciences.

The Intrapersonal Learner

The Intrapersonal Learner

Works and learns best when they are alone. Self-motivated and often introverts. They tend to enter creative fields and become entrepreneurs.


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All You Need to Know About Learning Disorders

learning disorders best education

All you need to know about Learning Disorders

“Study hard! You will be a CAPS level 7 student” – they say.

However, sometimes no matter how hard you study you still do not get the desired results and at most times you just never seem to make it. You are not doing anything wrong, it might just be a learning disorder. 

Learning disorders/disabilities are neurological. Best characterized by difficulty in reading, writing, spelling, reasoning, recalling and /or organizing information if left to figure out things on your own or if taught in conventional ways.

Learner disabilities

Children with learning disabilities are as smart or smarter than their peers, except they have the above-mentioned difficulties. Learning disabilities are life long and incurable. 

Learning disabilities often interfere with higher-level skills such as

  • organization
  • time planning
  • long and short term memory and
  • attention.

They have a great impact on one’s life beyond the classroom. They affect relationships with friends, family, and peers. CAPS teachers are most likely to pick up these disabilities as they deal with learners first hand in schools. Other individuals can go through life without knowing they have difficulties with either academics or personal relationships. 

Some Facts About Learning Disabilities 

  • Approximately 10-30 % of children have learning disabilities
  • Learning disabilities are more prevalent in boys than in girls
  • Difficulty with basic reading and language skills are the most common learning disabilities. As many as  80% of students with learning disabilities have problems with reading in CAPS. 
  • Learning disabilities often run in families. 
  • Learning disabilities should not be confused with other disabilities such as autism, intellectual disability, blindness, deafness, and behavioral disorders 
  • Attention disorders, such as Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and learning disabilities often occur at the same time, but these two disorders are not the same. 
boys than in girls

Some Of The Signs Indicative Of A Learning Disability 

  • Difficulty following verbal instructions
  • Problems with math skills
  • Difficulty remembering
  • Failure to finish tasks on time
  • Forgetting homework or assignments
  • Losing their place when reading or copying
  • Asking self-explanatory questions
  • An awareness of a mistake, but difficulty correcting it
  • Poor handwriting
  • Clumsiness 
  • Difficulty making choices, identifying main ideas from details 
  • Poor attention span

Learning Disabilities in CAPS

Dyslexia/Reading Disorder

Visual-Perceptual-Visual-Motor-Deficit-with-CAPS

A language-based disability in which a person has trouble understanding written words. How bad it varies within individuals, affects reading fluency, decoding, reading comprehension, recall, writing, spelling, and sometimes speech and can coexist with other related disorders.

Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia CAPS

A mathematical disability in which a person has difficulty solving arithmetic problems and grasping math problems. They show poor comprehension of maths symbols, may struggle with memorizing and organizing numbers, problems telling time, or have trouble with counting.

Dysgraphia

Dysgraphia

A writing disability in which a person finds it hard to form letters or write within a defined space. A learner is unable to produce legible handwriting in an appropriate length of time.

Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) / Central Auditory Processing Disorder

Auditory-Processing-Disorder-in-CAPS

This condition negatively affects how sound that travels unimpeded through the ear is processed or interpreted by the brain. Affected individuals do not recognize subtle differences between sounds in words even when sounds are audible enough to be heard. They have a hard time locating the source of a sound, to make sense of the order of sounds, or to block out competing for background noises.

Language Processing Disorder (LPD)

Language Processing Disorder CAPS

Relates to the processing of language. Affects expressive language and or receptive language. It is a specific type of APD in which there are difficulties attaching meaning to sound groups that form words, sentences, and stories.

Visual Perceptual/Visual Motor Deficit

Visual-Perceptual-Visual-Motor-Deficit-with-CAPS

A disorder that affects the understanding of information that a person sees, or the ability to draw or copy even though they appear to have normal vision. It can result in missing subtle differences in shapes or printed letters, losing space frequently, struggles with cutting, holding the pencil too tightly, and or poor eye/hand coordination.

Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities (NLD)

Non-Verbal-Learning-Disabilities-caps

A neurological disorder that originates in the right hemisphere of the brain, causing problems with visual-spatial, intuitive, organizational, evaluative and holistic processing functions.

Intervention
• Group or individual remedial lessons
• Occupational Therapy for children with NLD
• Physiotherapy for NLD and motor disabilities
• Speech and Language therapy for children with LPD and APD
• Homework tutors to assist with individual homework sessions

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Gr. 3 CAPS English FAL Book 1

Gr. 3 CAPS English FAL Book 1

Gr. 3 CAPS English FAL Book 1​

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Gr. 3 CAPS English FAL Book 1​

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IndexGr. 3 CAPS English FAL Book 1

Grade 3 CAPS English FAL Book 1 Index
Thinking about our holidays
Nomsa went to the farm
About farm life
Jabu went to the zoo
Sports Day
It’s Sport Day
The games we play
What I like to do
We like reading
Reading a book
A big family
My own family
We keep our home clean
Visiting granny
Just checking

Ann writes a letter
What Nomsa and Ann will do
Ann visits Nomsa
Let’s start cooking
Visiting Thabo
Planning our trip
Getting ready to go
We see a new town
We go on a boat
On the island
To the mountain
On the mountain
Flying back home
After our trip
Just checking
At what time?
About time
Seasons and weather
Reading a weather chart
After the storm

We work in our garden
We grow vegetables
Just checking

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Gr. 2 CAPS English FAL Book 1

Gr. 2 CAPS English FAL Book 1

Gr. 2 CAPS English FAL Book 1

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Gr. 2 CAPS English FAL Book 1

Grade 2 CAPS English FAL Book 1

IndexGr. 2 CAPS English FAL Book 1

Grade 2 CAPS English FAL Book 1 Index
Back to school
Jabu falls at school
After school
We are happy
We go to school by…
To school and back
We eat at school
The food we eat
Who, what, why and when
Our family garden
My own family
We grow food
We go for a picnic
What we like to do
At the park
We like to play
People who help
How they help us
Places in town

The animal train
Wild animals
All about animals
At the beach
Things we do
At the farm visiting Grandmother
Farm life
Just checking our personal information
Our busy week
Days of the week
Day and night
What we do
Calendars
Whan is your birthday?
Autumn and spring
Summer and winter
The clothes we wear

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Gr. 6 CAPS English FAL Book 1

Gr. 6 CAPS English FAL Book 1

Gr. 6 CAPS English FAL Book 1

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Gr. 6 CAPS English FAL Book 1

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IndexGr. 6 CAPS English FAL Book 1

Grade 6 CAPS English Book 1 Index
Joe plays soccer after all
Thinking about the game
Writing a story
Getting it right
Our vegetable garden
Puzzles and poems
Word families
Just checking
What’s in the news?
Planning your news article
The food we eat
More about language
News from the sea
Making unsafe places safe
Thinking about safety
Play the Tense Game

Michael gets a pet
The tale of the tail
Proper nouns
And now for the action
The aliens have landed!
Meeting an alien
Join them up!
Just checking
About town
What’s on the box?
Working with words
Feeling negative
About space
Out of this world
Looking at language
Who owns it?

The brave little fish
More about the brave little fish
Writing your story
Demonstrative pronouns
The Lion King story
The lion sleeps tonight
Fun with language
Tense game
Animals big and small
Sharing our world with animals
Join them up!
Whose is it?
A radio interview
Thinking about the stars
About me
Can you remember?

A story about Myrtle the turtle
Caring for sea animals
Myrtle writes a letter
The little turtle
City or village
Language urban and rural
Spreading the news
Caring for our environment
Our safety
Thinking about safety
Designing a questionnaire
Looking at language
On the internet
More map work
Finding your way